Coronavirus: An Update From The Vets

Coronavirus: An Update From The Vets

Worried about your pet's vaccinations? Is your vet still open and how do you get to see them? What is the current advice on pet neutering? As the lockdown continues, we thought we would update you on how the vet services have changed since the recent Government update about the lockdown.

Vaccinations

Over the past few months, many pets have patiently been waiting to get their vaccinations up to date or begin their primary course of vaccinations. Visits to the surgery should only be made if essential, however, there are certain circumstances when vets are allowed to administer a vaccine:

  • Primary vaccination courses are available to puppies to minimise the risk of contracting fatal diseases such as parvovirus, leptospirosis and distemper.
  • Kittens are able to wait until 6 months of age to be vaccinated and we would encourage keeping them indoors until then.
  • Booster vaccinations are suspended until further notice. Your pet will retain immunity from previous vaccinations, but this will start to fade over the next few months. Once the lockdown regulations are relaxed, your vet will advise on whether your pet can be given a normal booster or if they will need to restart their vaccination course.

Neutering

Routine neutering is currently suspended, however requests will be assessed on a case by case basis and your vet may consider surgery where appropriate i.e. if a male and female living together. Vets use the below pyramid as a guide to determine whether your pet needs to be neutered during this period. If you are worried about your pet’s health, please call your practice and they can guide you on the right course of action.
neutering

Grooming

  • Due to the high risk to public health and due to social distancing regulation, we advise you to continue to groom your pet yourself to reduce the incidence of knots.
  • Many of you are also worried about nail clipping. This can wait for a few weeks. However, if your pet’s nails start to grow very long or round, do not worry. Simply give your vet a call and they will be able to advise you further. Please do not attempt to clip your pet’s nails as it can cause many nasty injuries. Many pet injuries have resulted from their owners clipping their nails with scissors.
  • If your dog has sore anal glands, call your surgery and your vet will assess the situation and advise on whether you need to attend the surgery.

Emergencies

Vet practices are only open for emergencies and urgent cases. If you are worried about your pet, for your peace of mind, do call the surgery and they may be able to see you by video consultation or talk to you through a phone consultation. Many vets offer these additional services to help you and your pet during this worrying time.

Safety at the surgery

If a visit to the practice is deemed necessary, the vets will ask you to wait outside to maintain social distancing. Upon your arrival at the surgery:
  • Please call the practice and let them know you have arrived for your appointment.
  • One of the staff will come to collect your pet once the vet is available.
  • The consultation can then be carried out by phone with your vet.
To minimize the transmission of infection, vets, nurses and receptionists are wearing masks and gloves at all times and the practices have hygiene protocols in place as well as checks at regular intervals. If you are currently in a household that is self-isolating or if you have been diagnosed with Covid-19, please inform your vet.

Video Consultations

Online appointments are used initially as triage, allowing the veterinary surgeons to make a clinical judgement as to whether your pet can be treated remotely or will need to attend the practice for an examination. If you don’t have access to a device with a camera, many vets are also offering telephone consultations. Should your pet need to be physically examined at the surgery, your vet will assess the situation and will invite you in for an appointment.

Nurse Consults

Preventative care is very important especially during this unsettling time. Many vet practices are offering preventative advice (sometimes for free) with their veterinary nurses. Speak with your vet to find out what services they are offering.

Medications

Since many vet practices are trying to limit the number of clients visiting the surgery, try buying your pet’s medication online. In our online shop, we have a wide range of products to choose from to make sure that your special companions are safe and protected. If you are concerned that your pet needs medication, please call your vet for advice. For certain repeat prescriptions, it may be possible for your vet to email, post or deliver these to you.

Covid-19 Symptoms

If you are currently in a household that is self-isolating or if you have been diagnosed with Covid-19, please don't go into the surgery and inform your vet. They then will be able to advise you further on how they can still treat your pet and find alternative ways to get your pet to the vet if necessary, following a video consultation.


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